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Cleveland Indians: 3 corner infielders to know for the MLB Draft

dgasper
FORT BRAGG, NC - JULY 03: A detailed view of baseballs prior to the game between the Miami Marlins and Atlanta Braves on July 3, 2016 in Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The Fort Bragg Game marks the first regular season MLB game ever to be played on an active military base. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
FORT BRAGG, NC - JULY 03: A detailed view of baseballs prior to the game between the Miami Marlins and Atlanta Braves on July 3, 2016 in Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The Fort Bragg Game marks the first regular season MLB game ever to be played on an active military base. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images) /
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The Cleveland Indians are now less than two weeks away from making their selections on the first night of the MLB Draft. There are a couple of corner infield prospects that could intrigue the front office.

The corner infield is where most teams will have their power bats. The Cleveland Indians are no different as Jose Ramirez leads the team in long balls and Yonder Alonso isn’t too far behind. The corner infield is also an interesting position when it comes to the MLB Draft.

Very few teams spend first round picks on first basemen, but third base can be a hot commodity, although not as hot as shortstops. There are some really good prospects that could fall to the Indians with the 29th pick in the first round.

Nolan Gorman, 3B, O’Connor (AZ) HS

If you want tremendous raw power, Gorman is your pick. He’s got 70-grade power by some scouts’ measurements. Gorman has won home run derby’s at the MLB All Star Game showcase and Under Armour’s showcase at Wrigley Field. The kid can mash.

Like most power hitters, Gorman has a little bit of swing-and-miss in his game, but he’s got quick hands and should be able to overcome that with some coaching. He can hit for a decent average, so he’s not a home-run-or-bust type hitter.

Gorman is the 17th ranked draft prospect according to MLB Pipeline, which might put him out of range for the Indians. But, he’s had an inconsistent senior season and that could push down his draft stock. If the Indians believe in his hitting ability despite his less than stellar senior year, they could snatch a steal with the 29th pick in the draft and prevent him from attending the University of Arizona.

Jordan Groshans, 3B, Magnolia (TX) HS

Groshans is your do-it-all infielder. He can hit for a good average, he can hit for decent power, he can run well once he gets moving, and he can play a mean infield. Although a shortstop at his high school, (where most of the best players are), Groshans is destined for the hot corner with his strong throwing arm.

As MLB Pipeline’s 33rd ranked prospect, Groshans is right in the mix to be selected by the Cleveland Indians towards the end of the first round. Standing at a lean 6’4″ tall, Groshans could add some strength to his frame which will only add to his potential power hitting ability.

With quick hands and an advanced approach at the plate, Groshans could move quickly through the minor leagues for a high school player. But they’ll need to convince him to sign away from the University of Kansas.

Seth Beer, 1B, Clemson

First of all, what a name! Second of all, this kid can rake. In his three years at Clemson, Beer has totaled 53 home runs and a career batting average well over .300, combine that with his ability to draw twice as many walks as he strikes out, there was a lot of buzz around Beer being the first overall pick.

But a lot of scouts hopped off that bandwagon after a poor season on the wood bat circuit that has hung over his draft status. Also, he runs like molasses and is seen as a weak defender at first base and may be a future designated hitter.

His power and hit tool will have to carry him. If teams don’t believe in it, they won’t want to pick him early on. But if a team does believe in his hitting ability, the strategy is simple. Draft Beer.

Next: Why fans should care about the MLB Draft

Please excuse my poor puns, but Beer might not be the best selection, and drafting first basemen is always tricky because of the lack of options to move them defensively.

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