Should the Cleveland Indians Sign Edwin Encarnacion?

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Oct 14, 2016; Cleveland, OH, USA; Toronto Blue Jays designated hitter Edwin Encarnacion (10) hits a double against the Cleveland Indians in the first inning in game one of the 2016 ALCS playoff baseball series at Progressive Field. Mandatory Credit: Ken Blaze-USA TODAY Sports
Oct 14, 2016; Cleveland, OH, USA; Toronto Blue Jays designated hitter Edwin Encarnacion (10) hits a double against the Cleveland Indians in the first inning in game one of the 2016 ALCS playoff baseball series at Progressive Field. Mandatory Credit: Ken Blaze-USA TODAY Sports /
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Oct 9, 2016; Toronto, Ontario, CAN; Toronto Blue Jays designated hitter Edwin Encarnacion runs the bases after hitting a two-run home run against the Texas Rangers in the first inning during game three of the 2016 ALDS playoff baseball series at Rogers Centre. Mandatory Credit: Dan Hamilton-USA TODAY Sports
Oct 9, 2016; Toronto, Ontario, CAN; Toronto Blue Jays designated hitter Edwin Encarnacion runs the bases after hitting a two-run home run against the Texas Rangers in the first inning during game three of the 2016 ALDS playoff baseball series at Rogers Centre. Mandatory Credit: Dan Hamilton-USA TODAY Sports /

Reasons Why the Indians Should Not Sign Encarnacion

1. Price

Edwin Encarnacion’s price has dropped below what most experts and Encarnacion himself thought he would make. After rejecting a four-year, $80 million contract from Toronto, Edwin Encarnacion is believed to be seeking a three-year, $60 million contract. While this is a clear indication that Encarnacion overplayed his hand, his price point still appears to be a bit out of reach for the Cleveland Indians.

The Indians do not usually build their teams via free agency. Most of the Tribe’s free agent acquisitions of late have been veterans or utility players. Adding an annual salary of $20 million would bring their payroll to roughly $125 million, which is much higher than it has been over the past decade.

In fact, a payroll of $125 million would be the largest payroll in team history. A three-year, $60 million contract would also be the most expensive contract in Cleveland Indians history, both in terms of overall value and annual salary. The Indians do not like giving out big contracts like that, and Chris Antonetti has a history of being disciplined with the free agent market.

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