Cleveland Indians: A Position-by-Position Breakdown of the ALCS

henrypalattella
Oct 10, 2016; Boston, MA, USA; Cleveland Indians teammates celebrate after defeating the Boston Red Sox 4-3 in game three of the 2016 ALDS playoff baseball series at Fenway Park. Mandatory Credit: Bob DeChiara-USA TODAY Sports
Oct 10, 2016; Boston, MA, USA; Cleveland Indians teammates celebrate after defeating the Boston Red Sox 4-3 in game three of the 2016 ALDS playoff baseball series at Fenway Park. Mandatory Credit: Bob DeChiara-USA TODAY Sports /
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Outfield

Oct 9, 2016; Toronto, Ontario, CAN; Toronto Blue Jays center fielder Kevin Pillar cannot catch a ball hit for a two-run double by Texas Rangers first baseman Mitch Moreland (not pictured) in the 6th inning during game three of the 2016 ALDS playoff baseball series at Rogers Centre. Mandatory Credit: Nick Turchiaro-USA TODAY Sports
Oct 9, 2016; Toronto, Ontario, CAN; Toronto Blue Jays center fielder Kevin Pillar cannot catch a ball hit for a two-run double by Texas Rangers first baseman Mitch Moreland (not pictured) in the 6th inning during game three of the 2016 ALDS playoff baseball series at Rogers Centre. Mandatory Credit: Nick Turchiaro-USA TODAY Sports /

Indians: Rajai Davis, Coco Crisp, Tyler Naquin, Brandon Guyer, Lonnie Chisenhall

Blue Jays: Jose Bautista, Ezequiel Carrera, Kevin Pillar, Michael Saunders, Melvin Upton Jr.

Outfielders have been an X-factor for both of these teams so far this postseason. The Indians have been jumpstarted by the offensive play of right fielder Lonnie Chisenhall, while Toronto right fielder Ezequiel Carrera has been the unlikely postseason hero for the Blue Jays thus far.

Chisenhall has batted .300 so far this postseason, and helped turned the momentum against the Red Sox when he hit a big game-tying single in the first inning of Game One and a three-run home run in Game Two. Carrera, who started his big league career in Cleveland, has been a spark plug for the Jays offense, batting .375 while adding a home run, two RBIs, and four runs scored.

The rest of the Indians outfield were also factors in the sweep of the BoSox. Tyler Naquin finally got the monkey off his back when he hit a big two-run single in game three, Brandon Guyer went 3-for-4 in Game Two, Coco Crisp gave the Indians their permanent Game Three lead with his two-run home run over the Green Monster at Fenway Park, and Rajai Davis has game-changing speed.

Toronto’s outfielders are filled with positive attributes as well, and that begins and ends with Jose Bautista. Batista etched his name in postseason lore last year when he had the bat flip heard around the world, and while he’s only batting .200 this postseason, two of his three hits have left the yard. Kevin Pillar is one of the best fielding center fielders in all of baseball, and he’s chipped in in the power column this postseason with one home run. Michael Saunders looks to have put his rough second half behind him, as he’s hitting .286 so far this postseason, and the same cane said for Melvin Upton, who’s batting .286 as well with a homer.

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